Smart Launches Satellite-Connected Devices – SatSleeve for iPhones 5/5s and Samsung Galaxy S4, and Stand-Alone SatPhone XT





Smart today launched satellite devices addressing the needs of rescue efforts and disaster management – the SatSleeve, which turns your iPhone 5/5s or Samsung Galaxy S4 into a satellite phone (satphone), and the XT, a stand-alone water resistant and dust proof satphone with incredible stand-by and talk time.

SatSleeve for iPhone 5 and iPhone 5s

SatSleeve for iPhone 5 and iPhone 5s

Photo credit: Reg Ramos.

SatSleeve for Samsung Galaxy S4

SatSleeve for Samsung Galaxy S4

Rear view – there was no S4 available at the time to slap on the SatSleeve.

XT, stand-alone Satellite Phone

XT Stand Alone Satellite Phone

Companies inquiring about the XT, said Jonathan Huertas (Senior Manager for Business Development at Smart), aim at business continuity. The XT is water resistant, dust resistant, and shock proof. Add to that the 80 hours stand by time and 16 hours talk time and you see why there’s demand for this rugged-sexy phone. I know I want one.

The SatSleeve works in tandem with the SatSleeve mobile app available for free on iTunes and Google Play Store. Start the app on, slap your smartphone on the SatSleeve, and you can enjoy voice calls, text messages, data services, and social media apps on satellite mode – regardless if you’re in the middle of the sea or in remote area of the country.

SatSleeve and XT Specs Sheet
SatSleeve and XT Specs

SmartSAT

Both the SatSleeve and the XT won’t be much without SmartSAT, the satellite communication service Smart offers in partnership with Thuraya Telecommunications Company. SmartSat provides coverages across over 160 countries, including major sea lanes in Asia, New Zealand, Australia, the Middle East, Africa, Europe, and the Indian Ocean. That’s effectively two thirds of the world.

SmartSAT Pricing
  • The SatSleeves and the XT are offered in a SmartSat package worth P38,500 inclusive of a special satellite SIM with an initial airtime credit load (preloaded) of about $225 or around P10,000.00 valid for one year.
  • A voice call from a remote area costs about $0.57 per minute to Smart, Sun and PLDT numbers, and $0.80 per minute to other networks. International calls range from $0.57 to $5.75 depending on location.
  • SMS service costs $0.23 per message, while data service is charged $0.015 for every 10kb. Calling customer care hotline on satellite mode is free of charge.
  • Prepaid load cards will be available to subscribers to maintain satellite services.

 

  • Smart Launches SatSleeve and XT Satellite Phones

  • XT with Solar Charger

    The Solar Charger for the XT is sold separately. No pricing available at launch.

  • DSCF8302

    The whole nine yards – the SatSleeves for iPhone 5/5s and S4, solar charger, and the XT.

  • DSCF8328

    Left to right: Smart Senior Manager for Business Development at Smart Jonathan Huertas, Thuraya VP for Distribution Bilal El Hamoui, and Smart Global Access Group head Tina Z. Mariano.

  • Press Kit

    As organized as they get. This is a dream press kit/ product brochure organization for me. Every thing visibly labelled and easy to pull out and read. If only every media event gave out something this organized.

“Smart targets critical and demanding fields such as the media, the military, and the country’s disaster and emergency response agencies. We are also catering to business groups and even private individuals who need the security of having back-up or enhanced mobile coverage,” said Charles A. Lim, Smart EVP and Head of Wireless Consumer Business. 

Right now, Smart is the only mobile network in the Philippines that offer satellite services.

 

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Author

Irwin Allen Rivera loves his wife's cooking so much he's now twice the man he used to be. His English essay won a Don Carlos Palanca Memorial Award for Literature in 2012. His philosophical-horror story appeared in Philippine Speculative Fiction 8 (2013). He was managing editor and lead writer of Sites and Symbols 2 (2005), a coffee-table book about buildings in UP Diliman - his alma mater (BA Philosophy; MA Creative Writing continuing). He worked at the UP Diliman Information Office before shifting to web content writing. His sudden fiction, "Notwithstanding Pigs," initially a Friendster testimonial, appeared in Philippines Graphic (2006) and in Very Short Stories for Harried Readers (2007). He used to write for www.technoodling.net.